Welcome to Richard Clarke's website.

Having been a secondary school history teacher for 36 years and prison tutor for three I now focus on developing my interest in landscape history and on fostering an interest in others as a speaker, tutor, writer, guide and researcher (house and church).

I am available for consultation in areas such as:
  • Illustrated talks;
  • Presentations;
  • Guiding;
  • Articles;
  • Research.
Recent Posts
Simplified Geology of  Humber Region 23.
Simplified Geology of Humber Region 23.

Most of the historic villages of Holderness took the form of linear settlements, i.e. building plots straddling a road or lane, or villages around a simple grid-plan, i.e. building plots alongside a routeway with... [more]

Simplified Geology of Humber Region 22.
Simplified Geology of Humber Region 22.

Hedon is/was the one town of Holderness (Withernsea and Hornsea were certainly villages up until the coming of their railways, now long gone, they remain as small towns with their secondary schools each having... [more]

Simplified Geology of Humber Region 21.
Simplified Geology of Humber Region 21.

Today’s photo shows the underside of a misericord cleverly carved to show a seasonal scene, such carvings often showed a scene for each season, even a scene for each month of the year. Here... [more]

Simplified Geology of Humber Region 20.
Simplified Geology of Humber Region 20.

Professor English starts her Chapter 5 with some statements about Holderness’ basic geology, as has been done here over the last few blogs. She then goes on to that line of thought which is... [more]

Simplified Geology of Humber Region 19.
Simplified Geology of Humber Region 19.

Above is a photo of part of an exhibit about fishing in Holderness taken in the Hull and East Riding Museum. The Bulletin (s.p.b.s) concludes with what I always think is a good example... [more]

Simplified Geology of Humber Region 18.
Simplified Geology of Humber Region 18.

The sketch above is taken from the Bulletin (s.p.b.s) and given the caption ‘Fishing the mere in medieval times’. One point made in the Bulletin (s.p.b.s) is that the meres would have provided a... [more]