Welcome to Richard Clarke's website.

Having been a secondary school history teacher for 36 years and prison tutor for three I now focus on developing my interest in landscape history and on fostering an interest in others as a speaker, tutor, writer, guide and researcher (house and church).

I am available for consultation in areas such as:
  • Illustrated talks;
  • Presentations;
  • Guiding;
  • Articles;
  • Research.
Recent Posts
Views of the Humber 13.
Views of the Humber 13.

Above a somewhat unusual angle not showing Trent Falls but the end of the scarp slope of the Lincolnshire Wolds and the plantation (woodland) through which the A1077 snakes down the steep gradient into... [more]

Views of the Humber 12.
Views of the Humber 12.

Today’s picture from the recent walk (s.p.b.s) was taken from the side of Elloughton Wold, looking south-east over Elloughton village, across a section of the middle-reaches of the Estuary to the south bank beyond.... [more]

Views of the Humber 11.
Views of the Humber 11.

Recently went on a walk up and down some vales and wolds on the southern edge of the Yorkshire Wolds which afforded some panoramic views over the Humber. Starting on Beverley Road, South Cave... [more]

Views of the Humber 10.
Views of the Humber 10.

The last of the four sections of John Scott’s navigational map (1734) of the Humber Estuary shows the top part of mouth of the Estuary, The map extending as far south as ‘Donner Ness’... [more]

Views of the Humber 9.
Views of the Humber 9.

This third extract from Scott’s 18th century navigational map shows the area of the lower Humber Estuary between Grimsby on the south bank and Easington on the north. It shows the then Sunk Island... [more]

Views of the Humber 8.
Views of the Humber 8.

Another view from the same point as two blogs back, view north-north-east across the Estuary to the southern Yorkshire Wolds beyond. The farm-house and buildings centre known as ‘Poor Farm’, not because of the... [more]