Welcome to Richard Clarke's website.

Having been a secondary school history teacher for 36 years and prison tutor for three I now focus on developing my interest in landscape history and on fostering an interest in others as a speaker, tutor, writer, guide and researcher (house and church).

I am available for consultation in areas such as:
  • Illustrated talks;
  • Presentations;
  • Guiding;
  • Articles;
  • Research.
Recent Posts
Recent middle distance walk, Yorkshire Wolds.
Recent middle distance walk, Yorkshire Wolds.

Just a one blog break from ‘Disused rail-lines as public rights of way’. Started at Drewton just east of the A1034 South Cave to Market Weighton road. Walked up past the working limestone quarry¬†... [more]

Disused rail-lines as public rights of way 6.
Disused rail-lines as public rights of way 6.

Incidentally, on crossing the minor road to Goodmanham (s.p.b.) the Hudson Way and the Yorkshire Wolds Way (long distance footpath) cross, the latter going broadly south-north. On passing a post-war housing estate on the... [more]

Disused rail-lines as public rights of way 5.
Disused rail-lines as public rights of way 5.

A tributary rail-line from the Hudson Way passed through Goodmanham parish, part of it being a public right of way. The parish of Goodmanham is a significant historic area with its church dedicated to... [more]

Disused rail lines as public rights of way, 4.
Disused rail lines as public rights of way, 4.

The photo above shows the church of All Hallows, Goodmanham as view from the village street from the south-west. Goodmanham is a small village just north-east of Market Weighton. Continuing the Hudson Way public... [more]

Disused rail lines as public rights of way (3).
Disused rail lines as public rights of way (3).

The above portrait (taken from the Internet) is of George Hudson, 1800-1871, the famous Victorian railway promoter, financier and politician who, before he fled abroad to avoid imprisonment for debt, had considerable connections with... [more]

Disused railway lines as public rights of way.
Disused railway lines as public rights of way.

The above photo shows Barton station buildings before their demolition in 1973, this time looking west (s.p.b.), scanned from p. 38 of Anthony Berridge’s book, s.p.b. Of course ‘the Barton Line’ is still a... [more]